Rose Breasted Cockatoo Training | Birdtricks.com
 

Rose Breasted Cockatoo

Pretty In Pink

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When most people think of a cockatoo, the image of a large white bird with a magnificent, tall crest comes to mind. This is not at all the description of the rosebreasted cockatoo, also known as the “galah”.

They have stocky bodies of grey and vibrant pink and their erected crest looks like a delicate tiara compared to the lavish crests of the larger cockatoos.

2341574091_0d45df3557In personality, they are less demanding of attention than the white cockatoos and cannot correctly be called “cuddlers”. But make no mistake about it, they are cockatoos through and through, and are prone to same biting and screaming problems faced by dismayed cockatoo owners everywhere.

The rosebreasted cockatoo is very sensitive to its environment and takes particular notice of your handling (with emphasis on any mishandling.) When things are not done correctly, or if your bird feel you are failing in your duties, he will surely let you know in the most unpleasant way possible.

This Bird Is Playing Not Injured ;-)

This Bird Is Playing; He’s Not Injured ;-)

Your rosebrested cockatoo will need a spacious cage to roam and lots of toys and foraging opportunities to keep it physically fit and entertained. It will expect a lot of out of cage time and plenty of one on one attention from you.

Cockatoos are narcissistic. They believe that you get out of bed each day to tend to their needs and they have little patience for trivialities like your job or social engagements. The wise rosebreasted cockatoo owner will see that their bird is comfortable with every member of the household that it won’t feel slighted in your absence.

You MUST Train Your Rosebreasted Cockatoo

Training is the perfect vehicle for socialization to the entire family and it is highly recommended with this species of bird.

That’s why we hold a free online class for people who’ve never trained a bird before that reveals the strategies you MUST use to make sure your bird turns out to be a loving, well adjusted member of your family.

To register for this free class, go here: http://www.birdtricks.com/freeclass.

Keeping Your Rosebreasted Cockatoo Healthy

The rosebreasted cockatoo is prone to hypervitaminosis, a neurological affliction that is brought on by the over-saturation of certain nutrients. They are also very prone to Fatty Liver disease (FLD), a progressive and devastating disease that eventually results in liver failure.

Let me tell you story:

Jamie and Dave Womach began to notice feather plucking on the legs and under the wings of their rosebreasted cockatoo, Bondi, nearly a year ago. Following a vet visit, Bondi, as well as Bandit, their other rosebreasted cockatoo, were diagnosed with FLD.

The Womach’s flock are free-flighted and they take excellent care of their birds. There is nothing about any of their birds that says “fat and lazy” – it came as a huge shock to us all. Sadly, these birds are predisposed to this illness. Fortunately, when discovered in its early stages, FLD is reversible.

They made changes the diet to include foods that were more supportive of their liver conditions and within 30 DAYS, both birds were tested to be FLD free! That’s how powerful a proper diet can be!

7496659142_112865e56aWe discuss this situation, as well as many other diet related avian illnesses at length in our new nutrition course: Cooking For Parrots.

Improper diet can be blamed for most avian illnesses. Nutritional deficiencies cause your bird’s body to fail and a weakened immune system leaves them susceptible to disease. Poor diet is also strongly reflected through your bird’s behavior – a weak and tired parrot will bite first and ask questions later.

Diet is the most important part of the care you give your bird. Without good health, your bird cannot enjoy its life. Save your parrot from suffering and save yourself exorbitant veterinarian bills by offering your bird a healthy diet every day. Discover more about the right diet for your parrot here:

http://www.birdtricks.com/naturalfeeding